Ghosts of MySQL Past: Part 2

This continues on from my post yesterday and also contains content from my linux.conf.au 2014 talk (view video here).

Way back in May in the year 2000, a feature was added to MySQL that would keep many people employed for many years – replication. In 3.23.15 you could replicate from one MySQL instance to another. This is commonly cited as the results of two weeks of work by one developer. The idea is simple: create a log of all the SQL queries that modify the database and then replay them on a slave. Remember, this is before there was concurrency and everything was ISAM or MyISAM, so this worked (for certain definitions of worked).

The key things to remember about MySQL replication are: it was easy to use, it was easy to set up and it was built into the MySQL Server. This is why it won. You have to fast forward to September in 2010 before PostgreSQL caught up! It was only with PostgreSQL 9.0 that you could have queryable read-only slaves with stock standard PostgreSQL.

If you want to know why MySQL was so much bigger than PostgreSQL, this built in and easy to use replication was a huge reason. There is the age of a decent scotch between read-only slaves for MySQL and PostgreSQL (although I don’t think I’ve ever pointed that out to my PostgreSQL friends when having scotch with them… I shall have to!)

In 2001, when space was an odyssey, the first GA (General Availability) release of MySQL 3.23 hit the streets (quite literally, this was back in the day of software that came in actual physical boxes, so it quite probably was literally hitting the streets).

For a good piece of trivia, it’s 3.23.22-beta that is the first release in the current bzr tree, which means that it was around this time that BitKeeper first came into use for MySQL source code.

We also saw the integration of InnoDB in 2001. What was supremely interesting is that the transactional storage engine was not from MySQL AB, it was from Innobase Oy. The internals of the MySQL server were certainly not set up for transactions, and for many years (in fact, to this day) we talk about how a transactional engine was shoehorned in there. Every transactional engine since has had to do the same odd things to, say, find out when a transaction was being started. The exception here is in Drizzle, where we finally cleaned up a bunch of this mess.

Having a major component of the MySQL server owned and controlled by another company was an interesting situation, and one that would prove interesting in a few years time.

We also saw MÃ¥rten Mickos become CEO in 2001, a role he would have through the Sun acquisition – an acquisition that definitively proved that you can build an open source company and sell it for a *lot* of money. It was also the year that saw MySQL AB accept its first round of VC funding, and this would (of course) have interesting implications: some good, some less ideal.

(We’ll continue tomorrow with Part 3!)

1 thought on “Ghosts of MySQL Past: Part 2

  1. Oh yes, 2001 … i was just about to get assigned to my then-employers CMS team to do a MySQL->PostgreSQL port/migration (back then knowing a little about MySQL, a little bit more about Oracle8, and my PostgreSQL exposure only having been indirect via Ingress Illustra)

    Main resons for thinking about a DBMS switch back then was performance (mostly query optimizer related) …

    Then came replication and, in our CMS use case, probably even more important, fulltext search, the porting project was axed in favor of making use of these two …

    I sometimes wonder what my personal history would have looked like by now if it hadn’t been for these two features in 2001 …

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