j-core + Numato Spartan 6 board + Fedora 25

A couple of changes to http://j-core.org/#download_bitstream made it easy for me to get going:

  • In order to make ModemManager not try to think it’s a “modem”, create /etc/udev/rules.d/52-numato.rules with the following content:
    # Make ModemManager ignore Numato FPGA board
    ATTRS{idVendor}=="2a19", ATTRS{idProduct}=="1002", ENV{ID_MM_DEVICE_IGNORE}="1"
  • You will need to install python3-pyserial and minicom
  • The minicom command line i used was:
    sudo stty -F /dev/ttyACM0 -crtscts && minicom -b 115200 -D /dev/ttyACM0

and along with the instructions on j-core.org, I got it to load a known good build.

Windows NT4 for PowerPC guest on OPAL on POWER8 in qemu

Sometimes, programming is just for fun. This is what PREPHV is for Andrei Warkentin. To quote the README:

“This is mostly a huge ugly hack, derived from my
ppc64le_hello code. The running philosophy here is
to throw things together late at night with my family
asleep and see how far I get without a real design
or without a real desire to implement boring things
like IDE (*sigh*) emulation”

Since my day job is maintaining the firmware that it runs on, I decided to have a go (it also ties in with the retro stuff I’ve been blogging about). So…

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-22-20and I’m off! (yes, this is the very latest qemu and skiboot):

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-23-32screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-23-48Yes, prephv does clear all thirty two megabytes of guest memory

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-24-15A quick diversion, if you try Windows NT 3.51 for PowerPC, you get this:

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-18-17-35

But on NT4, you continue unharmed:

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-22-32A sign I needed to hack my filesystem of bits of NT installer bits a bit more:

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-22-45But, on my next try:

screenshot-from-2016-10-30-17-25-26Well… looks like there’s an instruction that needs to be emulated (and there’s no code to currently do that). Mind you… this is decently far into booting before we hit anything fatal, which is a pretty impressive effort – and it is tempting to continue and see if it’ll run on real hardware and if it could be made to work well enough to not find any disks :)

Failed Retro emulation attempts

For reasons that should escape everybody, I went back and looked at some old Operating Systems a little while ago: OS/2 Warp, Windows 3.11 and Microsoft Chicago. So, I went on a little adventure this weekend, largely in failure though.

Windows NT 3.51

This was the first version (err… no, second I think) of Windows NT that I ever used.

Lesson 1: qemu doesn’t expose a SCSI adapter that isn’t virtio-scsi (and I have a feeling there aren’t Windows NT 3.51 installer driver floppies for virtio-scsi)

screenshot_winnt3-1_2016-10-29_191707Lesson 2: OMG I’m so glad I don’t have to wait for things to be read off floppy disks anymore:

screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_193833Lesson 3: I’d forgotten that the Windows directory on NT 3.51 was different to every other Windows NT version, being \WINNT35

screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_194040screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_194139Lesson 3: Yeah, sometimes there’s just fail.

screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_194147

Windows NT 4.0

This brought the UI of Windows 95 to Windows NT. It was a thing. It required a fairly beefy PC for the day, but it could use two CPUs if you were that amazingly rich (dual Pentium Pro was a thing)

Lesson 1: Windows NT 4 does not like 8GB disks. My idea of “creating a small disk for a VM for an old OS as it probably won’t work well with a 20GB disk” needs to be adjusted. I’m writing this on a system with 8 times more RAM than what I ended up using for a disk for Windows NT 4.

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192840But hey, back to \WINNT rather than \WINNT35 or \WINDOWS

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192937

Lesson 2: Sometimes, full system emulation turns out to be a better idea:

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192418screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192304Lesson 3: Remember when Windows couldn’t actually format NTFS in the installer and it installed to FAT and then converted to NTFS? No? Well, aren’t you lucky.

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_193102screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_193235Apple Rhapsody DR2

Before there was MacOS X, there was a project called Rhapsody. This was to take NeXTStep (from NeXT, which Apple bought to get both NeXTStep and Steve Jobs as every internal “let’s replace the aging MacOS” project had utterly failed for the past ten years). Rhapsody was not going to be backwards compatible until everybody said that was a terrible idea and the Blue Box was added (known as Classic) – basically, a para-virtualized VM running the old MacOS 9.

Anyway, for the first two developer releases, it was also available on x86 (not just PowerPC). This was probably because a PowerPC port to Macs was a lot newer than the x86 port.

So, I dusted off the (virtual) Boot and Driver floppies and fired up qemu…..

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_172732Yeah, MacOS X got a better installer…

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_173227Hopeful!

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_182218This was after I decided that using KVM was a bad Idea:

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_172143

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_173333Nope… and this is where we stop. There seems to be some issue with ATA drivers? I honestly can’t be bothered to debug it (although… for the PowerPC version… maybe).

MacOS 9.2

Well.. this goes a lot better now thanks to a whole bunch of patches hitting upstream Qemu recently (thanks Ben!)

screenshot-from-2016-10-29-20-37-24screenshot-from-2016-10-29-20-42-10Yeah, I was kind of tempted to set up Outlook Express to read my email…. But running MacOS 9 was way too successful, so I had to stop there :)

MySQL removes the FRM (7 years after Drizzle did)

The new MySQL 8.0.0 milestone release that was recently announced brings something that has been a looooong time coming: the removal of the FRM file. I was the one who implemented this in Drizzle way back in 2009 (July 28th 2009 according to Brian)- and I may have had a flashback to removing the tentacles of the FRM when reading the MySQL 8.0.0 announcement.

As an idea for how long this has been on the cards, I’ll quote Brian from when we removed it in Drizzle:

We have been talking about getting rid of FRM since around 2003. I remember a drive up to northern Finland with Kaj Arnö, where we spent an hour talking about this. I, David, and MontyW have talked about this for years.

http://krow.livejournal.com/642329.html

Soo… it was a known problem for at least thirteen years. One of the issues removing it was how pervasive all of the FRM related things were. I shudder at the mention of “pack_flag” and Jay Pipes probably does too.

At the time, we tried a couple of approaches as to how things should look. Our philosophy with Drizzle was that it should get out of the way at let the storage engines be the storage engines and not try to second guess them or keep track of things behind their back. I still think that was the correct architectural approach: the role of Drizzle was to put SQL on top of a storage engine, not to also be one itself.

Looking at the MySQL code, there’s one giant commit 31350e8ab15179acab5197fa29d12686b1efd6ef. I do mean giant too, the diffstat is amazing:

 786 files changed, 58471 insertions(+), 25586 deletions(-)

How anyone even remotely did code review on that I have absolutely no idea. I know the only way I could get it to work in Drizzle was to do it incrementally, a series of patches that gradually chiseled out what needed to be taken out so I could put it an API and the protobuf code.

Oh, and in case you’re wondering:

- uint offset,pack_flag;
+ uint offset;

Thank goodness. Now, you may not appreciate that as much as I might, but pack_flag was not the height of design, it was… pretty much a catchalll for some kind of data about a field that wasn’t something that already had a field in the FRM. So it may include information on if the field could be null or not, if it’s decimal, how many bytes an integer takes, that it’s a number and how many oh, just don’t ask.

Also gone is the weird interval_id and a whole bunch of limitations because of the FRM format, including one that I either just discovered or didn’t remember: if you used all 256 characters in an enum, you couldn’t create the table as MySQL would pick either a comma or an unused character to be the separator in the FRM!?!

Also changed is how the MySQL server handles default values. For those not aware, the FRM file contains a static copy of the row containing default values. This means the default values are computed once on table creation and never again (there’s a bunch of work arounds for things like AUTO_INCREMENT and DEFAULT NOW()). The new sql/default_values.cc is where this is done now.

For now at least, table metadata is also written to a file that appears to be JSON format. It’s interesting that a SQL database server is using a schemaless file format to describe schema. It appears that these files exist only for disaster recovery or perhaps portable tablespaces. As such, I’m not entirely convinced they’re needed…. it’s just a thing to get out of sync with what the storage engine thinks and causes extra IO on DDL (as well as forcing the issue that you can’t have MVCC into the data dictionary itself).

What will be interesting is to see the lifting of these various limitations and how MariaDB will cope with that. Basically, unless they switch, we’re going to see some interesting divergence in what you can do in either database.

There’s certainly differences in how MySQL removed the FRM file to the way we did it in Drizzle. Hopefully some of the ideas we had were helpful in coming up with this different approach, as well as an extra seven years of in-production use.

At some point I’ll write something up as to the fate of Drizzle and a bit of a post-mortem, I think I may have finally worked out what I want to say…. but that is a post for another day.

First look at MySQL 8.0.0 Milestone

So, about ten days ago the MySQL Server Team released MySQL 8.0.0 Milestone to the world. One of the most unfortunate things about MySQL development is that it’s done behind closed doors, with the only hints of what’s to come arriving in maybe a note on a bug or such milestone releases that contain a lot of code changes. How much code change? Well, according to the text up on github for the 8.0 branch “This branch is 5714 commits ahead, 4 commits behind 5.7. ”

Way back in 2013, I looked at MySQL Code Size over releases, which I can again revisit and include both MySQL 5.7 and 8.0.0.

While 5.7 was a big jump again, we seem to be somewhat leveling off, which is a good thing. Managing to add features and fix long standing problems without bloating code size is good for software maintenance. Honestly, hats off to the MySQL team for keeping it to around a 130kLOC code size increase over 5.7 (that’s around 5%).

These days I’m mostly just a user of MySQL, pointing others in the right direction when it comes to some issues around it and being the resident MySQL grey(ing)beard(well, if I don’t shave for a few days) inside IBM as a very much side project to my day job of OPAL firmware.

So, personally, I’m thrilled about no more FRM, better Unicode, SET PERSIST and performance work. With my IBM hat on, I’m thrilled about the fact that it compiled on POWER out of the box and managed to work (I haven’t managed to crash it yet). There seems to be a possible performance issue, but hey, this is a huge improvement over the 5.7 developer milestones when run on POWER.

A lot of the changes are focused around usability, making it easier to manage and easier to run at at least a medium amount of scale. This is long overdue and it’s great to see even seemingly trivial things like SET PERSIST coming (I cannot tell you how many times that has tripped me up).

In a future post, I’ll talk about the FRM removal!

Lesson 124 in why scales on a graph matter…

The original article presented two graphs: one of MariaDB searches (which are increasing) and the other showing MySQL searches (decreasing or leveling out). It turns out that the y axis REALLY matters.

I honestly expected better….

Microsoft Chicago – retro in qemu!

So, way back when (sometime in the early 1990s) there was Windows 3.11 and times were… for Workgroups. There was this Windows NT thing, this OS/2 thing and something brewing at Microsoft to attempt to make the PC less… well, bloody awful for a user.

Again, thanks to abandonware sites, it’s possible now to try out very early builds of Microsoft Chicago – what would become Windows 95. With the earliest build I could find (build 56), I set to work. The installer worked from an existing Windows 3.11 install.

I ended up using full system emulation rather than normal qemu later on, as things, well, booted in full emulation and didn’t otherwise (I was building from qemu master… so it could have actually been a bug fix).

chicago-launch-setupMmmm… Windows 3.11 File Manager, the fact that I can still use this is a testament to something, possibly too much time with Windows 3.11.

chicago-welcome-setupchicago-setupUnfortunately, I didn’t have the Plus Pack components (remember Microsoft Plus! ?- yes, the exclamation mark was part of the product, it was the 1990s.) and I’m not sure if they even would have existed back then (but the installer did ask).

chicago-install-dirObviously if you were testing Chicago, you probably did not want to upgrade your working Windows install if this was a computer you at all cared about. I installed into C:\CHICAGO because, well – how could I not!

chicago-installingThe installation went fairly quickly – after all, this isn’t a real 386 PC and it doesn’t have of-the-era disks – everything was likely just in the linux page cache.

chicago-install-networkI didn’t really try to get network going, it may not have been fully baked in this build, or maybe just not really baked in this copy of it, but the installer there looks a bit familiar, but not like the Windows 95 one – maybe more like NT 3.1/3.51 ?

But at the end… it installed and it was time to reboot into Chicago:
chicago-bootSo… this is what Windows 95 looked like during development back in July 1993 – nearly exactly two years before release. There’s some Windows logos that appear/disappear around the place, which are arguably much cooler than the eventual Windows 95 boot screen animation. The first boot experience was kind of interesting too:
Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-57-00Luckily, there was nothing restricting the beta site ID or anything. I just entered the number 1, and was then told it needed to be 6 digits – so beta site ID 123456 it is! The desktop is obviously different both from Windows 3.x and what ended up in Windows 95.

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-57-48Those who remember Windows 3.1 may remember Dr Watson as an actual thing you could run, but it was part of the whole diagnostics infrastructure in Windows, and here (as you can see), it runs by default. More odd is the “Switch To Chicago” task (which does nothing if opened) and “Tracker”. My guess is that the “Switch to Chicago” is the product of some internal thing for launching the new UI. I have no ideawhat the “Tracker” is, but I think I found a clue in the “Find File” app:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 14-10-10Not only can you search with regular expressions, but there’s “Containing text”, could it be indexing? No, it totally isn’t. It’s all about tracking/reporting problems:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 14-15-19Well, that wasn’t as exciting as I was hoping for (after all, weren’t there interesting database like file systems being researched at Microsoft in the early 1990s?). It’s about here I should show the obligatory About box:
Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-58-10It’s… not polished, and there’s certainly that feel throughout the OS, it’s not yet polished – and two years from release: that’s likely fair enough. Speaking of not perfect:

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-59-03When something does crash, it asks you to describe what went wrong, i.e. provide a Clue for Dr. Watson:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-09-22

But, most importantly, Solitaire is present! You can browse the Programs folder and head into Games and play it! One odd tihng is that applications have two >> at the end, and there’s a “Parent Folder” entry too.

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-01-24Solitair itself? Just as I remember.

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 21-21-27Notably, what is missing is anything like the Start menu, which is probably the key UI element introduced in Windows 95 that’s still with us today. Instead, you have this:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 11-55-15That’s about the least exciting Windows menu possible. There’s the eye menu too, which is this:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 11-56-12More unfinished things are found in the “File cabinet”, such as properties for anything:
Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-02-00But let’s jump into Control Panels, which I managed to get to by heading to C:\CHICAGO\Control.sys – which isn’t exactly obvious, but I think you can find it through Programs as well.Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-02-41Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-05-40The “Window Metrics” application is really interesting! It’s obvious that the UI was not solidified yet, that there was a lot of experimenting to do. This application lets you change all sorts of things about the UI:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-05-57My guess is that this was used a lot internally to twiddle things to see what worked well.

Another unfinished thing? That familiar Properties for My Computer, which is actually “Advanced System Features” in the control panel, and from the [Sample Information] at the bottom left, it looks like we may not be getting information about the machine it’s running on.

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-06-39

You do get some information in the System control panel, but a lot of it is unfinished. It seems as if Microsoft was experimenting with a few ways to express information and modify settings.

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-07-13But check out this awesome picture of a hard disk for Virtual Memory:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-07-47The presence of the 386 Enhanced control panel shows how close this build still was to Windows 3.1:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-08-08At the same time, we see hints of things going 32 bit – check out the fact that we have both Clock and Clock32! Notepad, in its transition to 32bit, even dropped the pad and is just Note32!

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-11-10Well, that’s enough for today, time to shut down the machine:
Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-15-45

Windows 3.11 nostalgia

Because OS/2 didn’t go so well… let’s try something I’m a lot more familiar with. To be honest, the last time I in earnest used Windows on the desktop was around 3.11, so I kind of know it back to front (fun fact: I’ve read the entire Windows 3.0 manual).

It turns out that once you have MS-DOS installed in qemu, installing Windows 3.11 is trivial. I didn’t even change any settings for Qemu, I just basically specced everything up to be very minimal (50MB RAM, 512mb disk).

win31-setupwin31-disk4win31-installedWindows 3.11 was not a fun time as soon as you had to do anything… nightmares of drivers, CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT plague my mind. But hey, it’s damn fast on a modern processor.

OS/2 Warp Nostalgia

Thanks to the joys of abandonware websites, you can play with some interesting things from the 1990s and before. One of those things is OS/2 Warp. Now, I had a go at OS/2 sometime in the 1990s after being warned by a friend that it was “pretty much impossible” to get networking going. My experience of OS/2 then was not revolutionary… It was, well, something else on a PC that wasn’t that exciting and didn’t really add a huge amount over Windows.

Now, I’m nowhere near insane enough to try this on my actual computer, and I’ve managed to not accumulate any ancient PCs….

Luckily, qemu helps with an emulator! If you don’t set your CPU to Pentium (or possibly something one or two generations newer) then things don’t go well. Neither does a disk that by today’s standards would be considered beyond tiny. Also, if you dare to try to use an unpartitioned hard disk – OH MY are you in trouble.

Also, try to boot off “Disk 1” and you get this:
os2-wrong-floppyPossibly the most friendly error message ever! But, once you get going (by booting the Installation floppy)… you get to see this:

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 19-12-19and indeed, you are doing the time warp of Operating Systems right here. After a bit of fun, you end up in FDISK:

os2-installos2-1gb-too-muchWhy I can’t create a partition… WHO KNOWS. But, I tried again with a 750MB disk that already had a partition on it and…. FAIL. I think this one was due to partition type, so I tried again with partition type of 6 – plain FAT16, and not W95 FAT16 (LBA). Some memory is coming back to me of larger drives and LBA and nightmares…

But that worked!

warp4-installingos2-checkingThen, the OS/2 WARP boot screen… which seems to stick around for a long time…..

os2-install-2and maybe I could get networking….

os2-networkLadies and Gentlemen, the wonders of having to select DHCP:

os2-dhcpIt still asked me for some config, but I gleefully ignored it (because that must be safe, right!?) and then I needed to select a network adapter! Due to a poor choice on my part, I started with a rtl8139, which is conspicuously absent from this fine list of Token Ring adapters:

os2-tokenringand then, more installing……

os2-more-installingbefore finally rebooting into….

os2-failand that, is where I realized there was beer in the fridge and that was going to be a lot more fun.

linux.conf.au 2016 Kernel miniconf CFP

Why yes, it’s another long URL thanks to Google Docs: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/148SieC6vmAxJZ3R5Lz5e1Mb0IM06LNSCt6WNVEwYFcs/viewform

Got a kernel topic you want to talk about? Got a kernel topic you want to start discussion on? Or a Q&A? Submit NOW! We’re going for part sessions, part unconference.

Questions? Contact me at stewart@linux.vnet.ibm.com

An update on using Tor on Android

Back in 2012 I wrote a blog post on using Tor on Android which has proved quite popular over the years.

These days, there is the OrFox browser, which is from The Tor Project and is likely the current best way to browse the web through Tor on your Android device.

If you’re still using the custom setup Firefox, I’d recommend giving OrFox a try – it’s been working quite well for me.

MySQL on NUMA machines just got better!

A followup to my previous entry , my patch that was part of Bug #72811 Set NUMA mempolicy for optimum mysqld performance has been merged!

I hope it’s enabled by default so that everything “just works”.

I also hope it filters down through MariaDB and Percona Server fairly quickly.

Also, from the release notes on that bug, I think we can expect 5.7.8 any day now.

The sad state of MySQL and NUMA

Way back in 2010, MySQL Bug 57241 was filed, pointing out that the “swap insanity” problem was getting serious on x86 systems – with NUMA being more and more common back then.

The swapping problem is due to running out of memory on a NUMA node and having to swap things to other nodes (see Jeremy Cole‘s blog entry also from 2010 on the topic of swap insanity). This was back when 64GB and dual quad core CPUs was big – in the past five years big systems have gotten bigger.

Back then there were two things you could do to have your system be usable: 1) numa=off as kernel boot parameter (this likely has other implications though) and 2) “numactl –interleave all” in mysqld_safe script (I think MariaDB currently has this built in if you set an option but I don’t think MySQL does, otherwise perhaps the bug would have been closed).

Anyway, it’s now about 5 years since this bug was opened and even when there’s been a patch in the Twitter MySQL branch for a while (years?) and my Oracle Contributor Agreement signed patch attached to bug 72811 since May 2014 (over a year) we still haven’t seen any action.

My patch takes the approach of you want things allocated at server startup to be interleaved across nodes (e.g. buffer pool) while runtime allocations are probably per connection and are thus fine (in fact, better) to do node local allocations.

Without a patch like this, or without running mysqld with the right numactl incantation, you end up either having all your memory on one NUMA node (potentially not utilising full memory bandwidth of the hardware), or you end up with swap insanity, or you end up with some other not exactly what you’d expect situation.

While we could have MySQL be more NUMA aware and perhaps do a buffer pool instance per NUMA node or some such thing, it’s kind of disappointing that for dedicated database servers bought in the past 7+ years (according to one comment on one of the bugs) this crippling issue hasn’t been addressed upstream.

Just to make it even more annoying, on certain workloads you end up with a lot of mutex contention, which can end up meaning that binding MySQL to fewer NUMA nodes (memory and CPU) ends up increasing performance (cachelines don’t have as far to travel) – this is a different problem than swap insanity though, and one that is being addressed.

Update: My patch as part of https://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=72811 has been merged! MySQL on NUMA machines just got a whole lot better. I just hope it’s enabled by default…

OPAL firmware specification, conformance and documentation

Now that we have an increasing amount of things that run on top of OPAL:

  1. Linux
  2. hello_world (in skiboot tree)
  3. ppc64le_hello (as I wrote about yesterday)
  4. FreeBSD

and that the OpenPower ecosystem is rapidly growing (especially around people building OpenPower machines), the need for more formal specification, conformance testing and documentation for OPAL is increasing rapidly.

If you look at the documentation in the skiboot tree late last year, you’d notice a grand total of seven text files. Now, we’re a lot better (although far from complete).

I’m proud to say that I won’t merge new code that adds/modifies an OPAL API call or anything in the device tree that doesn’t come with accompanying documentation, and this has meant that although it may not be perfect, we have something that is a decent starting point.

We’re in the interesting situation of starting with a working system, with mainline Linux kernels now for over a year (maybe even 18 months) being able to be booted by skiboot and run on powernv hardware (the more modern the kernel the better though).

So…. if anyone loves going through deeply technical documentation… do I have a project you can contribute to!

FreeBSD on OpenPower

There’s been some work on porting FreeBSD over to run natively on top of OPAL, that is, on bare metal OpenPower machines (not just under KVM).

This is one of four possible things to run natively on an OPAL system:

  1. Linux
  2. hello_world (in skiboot tree)
  3. ppc64le_hello (as I wrote about yesterday)
  4. FreeBSD

It’s great to see that another fully featured OS is getting ported to POWER8 and OPAL. It’s not yet at a stage where you could say it was finished or anything (PCI support is pretty preliminary for example, and fancy things like disks and networking live on PCI).

hello world as ppc66le OPAL payload!

While the in-tree hello-world kernel (originally by me, and Mikey managed to CUT THE BLOAT of a whole SEVENTEEN instructions down to a tiny ten) is very, very dumb (and does one thing, print “Hello World” to the console), there’s now an alternative for those who like to play with a more feature-rich Hello World rather than booting a more “real” OS such as Linux. In case you’re wondering, we use the hello world kernel as a tiny test that we haven’t completely and utterly broken things when merging/developing code.

https://github.com/andreiw/ppc64le_hello is a wonderful example of a small (INTERACTIVE!) starting point for a PowerNV (as it’s called in Linux) or “bare metal” (i.e. non-virtualised) OS on POWER.

What’s more impressive is that this was all developed using the simulator rather than real hardware (although I think somebody has tried it on some now).

Kind of neat!

gcov code coverage for OpenPower firmware

For skiboot (which provides the OPAL boot and runtime firmware for OpenPower machines), I’ve been pretty interested at getting some automated code coverage data for booting on real hardware (as well as in a simulator). Why? Well, it’s useful to see that various test suites are actually testing what you think they are, and it helps you be able to define more tests to increase what you’re covering.

The typical way to do code coverage is to make GCC build your program with GCOV, which is pretty simple if you’re a userspace program. You build with gcov, run program, and at the end you’re left with files on disk that contain all the coverage information for a tool such as lcov to consume. For the Linux kernel, you can also do this, and then extract the GCOV data out of debugfs and get code coverage for all/part of your kernel. It’s a little bit more involved for the kernel, but not too much so.

To achieve this, the kernel has to implement a bunch of stub functions itself rather than link to the gcov library as well as parse the GCOV data structures that GCC generates and emit the gcda files in debugfs when read. Basically, you replace the part of the GCC generated code that writes the files out. This works really nicely as Linux has fancy things like a VFS and debugfs.

For skiboot, we have no such things. We are firmware, we don’t have a damn file system interface. So, what do we do? Write a userspace utility to parse a dump of the appropriate region of memory, easy! That’s exactly what I did, a (relatively) simple user space app to parse out the gcov gcda files from a skiboot memory image – something we can easily dump out of the simulator, relatively easily (albeit slower) from the FSP on an IBM POWER system and even just directly out of a running system (if you boot a linux kernel with the appropriate config).

So, we can now get a (mostly automated) code coverage report simply for the act of booting to petitboot: https://open-power.github.io/skiboot/boot-coverage-report/ along with our old coverage report which was just for the unit tests (https://open-power.github.io/skiboot/coverage-report/). My current boot-coverage-report is just on POWER7 and POWER8 IBM FSP based systems – but you can see that a decent amount of code both is (and isn’t) touched simply from the act of booting to the bootloader.

The numbers we get are only approximate for any code run on more than one CPU as GCC just generates code that does a load/add/store rather than using an atomic increment.

One interesting observation was that (at least on smaller systems, which are still quite large by many people’s standards), boot time was not really noticeably increased.

For more information on running with gcov, see the in-tree documentation: https://github.com/open-power/skiboot/blob/master/doc/gcov.txt

Going beyond 1.3 MILLION SQL Queries/second

So, on a large IBM POWER8 system I was recently running the newly coined “yesmark” benchmark, which is best translated as this:

Benchmark (N for concurrency): for i in {1..N}; do yes "DO 0;" | mysql > /dev/null & done
Live results: mysqladmin -ri 1 extended-status | grep Questions

Which sounds all fun until you realize that it’s *amazingly* close in results to a sysbench point select benchmark these days (well, with MySQL 5.7.7).

Since yesmark doesn’t use InnoDB though, MariaDB is back in the game.

I don’t think it matters between MariaDB and MySQL at this point for yesbench. With MySQL in a KVM guest on a shared 2 socket POWER8 I could get 754kQPS and on a larger system, I could get 1.3 million / sec.

1.3 Million queries / sec is probably the highest number anybody has ever seen out of MySQL or MariaDB, so that’s fairly impressive in itself.

What’s also impressive is that on this workload, mysqld was still only using 50% of CPU in the system. The mysql command line client was really heavy user.

Other users are: 8% completely idle, another 12% in linux scheduler (alarmingly high really). So out of all execution time, only about 44% spent in mysqld, 29% in mysql client.

It seems that the current issues scaling to two socked POWER8 machines are the same as with scaling to other large systems, when we go beyond about 20 POWER8 cores (SMT8), we start to find new and interesting challenges.

Towards (and beyond) ONE MILLION queries per second

At Percona Live MySQL Conference 2015 next week I’ll be presenting on “Towards One MILLION queries per second” on 14th April at 4:50pm in Ballroom A.

This is the story of work I’ve been doing to get MySQL executing ONE MILLION SQL queries per second. It involves tales of MySQL, tales of the POWER8 Processor and a general amount of fun in extracting huge amounts of performance.

As I speak, I’m working on some even more impressive benchmark results! New hardware, new MySQL versions and really breaking news on MySQL scalability.