Fedora 25 + Lenovo X1 Carbon 4th Gen + OneLink+ Dock

As of May 29th 2017, if you want to do something crazy like use *both* ports of the OneLink+ dock to use monitors that aren’t 640×480 (but aren’t 4k), you’re going to need a 4.11 kernel, as everything else (for example 4.10.17, which is the latest in Fedora 25 at time of writing) will end you in a world of horrible, horrible pain.

To install, run this:

sudo dnf install \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-core-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-cross-headers-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-devel-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-modules-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-tools-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/kernel-tools-libs-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm \
https://kojipkgs.fedoraproject.org//packages/kernel/4.11.3/200.fc25/x86_64/perf-4.11.3-200.fc25.x86_64.rpm

This grabs a kernel that’s sitting in testing and isn’t yet in the main repositories. However, I can now see things on monitors, rather than 0 to 1 monitor (most often 0). You can also dock/undock and everything doesn’t crash in a pile of fail.

I remember a time when you could fairly reliably buy Intel hardware and have it “just work” with the latest distros. It’s unfortunate that this is no longer the case, and it’s more of a case of “wait six months and you’ll still have problems”.

Urgh.

(at least Wayland and X were bug for bug compatible?)

j-core + Numato Spartan 6 board + Fedora 25

A couple of changes to http://j-core.org/#download_bitstream made it easy for me to get going:

  • In order to make ModemManager not try to think it’s a “modem”, create /etc/udev/rules.d/52-numato.rules with the following content:
    # Make ModemManager ignore Numato FPGA board
    ATTRS{idVendor}=="2a19", ATTRS{idProduct}=="1002", ENV{ID_MM_DEVICE_IGNORE}="1"
  • You will need to install python3-pyserial and minicom
  • The minicom command line i used was:
    sudo stty -F /dev/ttyACM0 -crtscts && minicom -b 115200 -D /dev/ttyACM0

and along with the instructions on j-core.org, I got it to load a known good build.

Books referenced in my Organizational Change talk at LCA2017

All of these are available as Kindle books, but I’m sure you can get 3D copies too:

The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable by Patrick M. Lencioni
Leading Change by John P. Kotter
Who Says Elephants Can’t Dance? Louis V. Gerstner Jr.
Nonviolent Communication: A language of Life by Marshall B. Rosenberg and Arun Gandhi

Fast Reset, Trusted Boot and the security of /sbin/reboot

In OpenPOWER land, we’ve been doing some work on Secure and Trusted Boot while at the same time doing some work on what we call fast-reset (or fast-reboot, depending on exactly what mood someone was in at any particular time…. we should start being a bit more consistent).

The basic idea for fast-reset is that when the OS calls OPAL reboot, we gather all the threads in the system using a combination of patching the reset vector and soft-resetting them, then cleanup a few bits of hardware (we do re-probe PCIe for example), and reload & restart the bootloader (petitboot).

What this means is that typing “reboot” on the command line goes from a ~90-120+ second affair (through firmware to petitboot, linux distros still take ages to shut themselves down) down to about a 20 second affair (to petitboot).

If you’re running a (very) recent skiboot, you can enable it with a special hidden NVRAM configuration option (although we’ll likely enable it by default pretty soon, it’s proving remarkably solid). If you want to know what that NVRAM option is… Use the source, Luke! (or git history, but I’ve yet to see a neat Star Wars reference referring to git commit logs).

So, there’s nothing like a demo. Here’s a demo with Ubuntu running off an NVMe drive on an IBM S822LC for HPC (otherwise known as Minsky or Garrison) which was running the HTX hardware exerciser, through fast-reboot back into Petitboot and then booting into Ubuntu and auto-starting the exerciser (HTX) again.

Apart from being stupidly quick when compared to a full IPL (Initial Program Load – i.e. boot), since we’re not rebooting out of band, we have no way to reset the TPM, so if you’re measuring boot, each subsequent fast-reset will result in a different set of measurements.

This may be slightly confusing, but it’s not really a problem. You see, if a machine is compromised, there’s nothing stopping me replacing /sbin/reboot with something that just prints things to the console that look like your machine rebooted but in fact left my rootkit running. Indeed, fast-reset and a full IPL should measure different values in the TPM.

It also means that if you ever want to re-establish trust in your OS, never do a reboot from the host – always reboot out of band (e.g. from a BMC). This, of course, means you’re trusting your BMC to not be compromised, which I wouldn’t necessarily do if you suspect your host has been.

Failed Retro emulation attempts

For reasons that should escape everybody, I went back and looked at some old Operating Systems a little while ago: OS/2 Warp, Windows 3.11 and Microsoft Chicago. So, I went on a little adventure this weekend, largely in failure though.

Windows NT 3.51

This was the first version (err… no, second I think) of Windows NT that I ever used.

Lesson 1: qemu doesn’t expose a SCSI adapter that isn’t virtio-scsi (and I have a feeling there aren’t Windows NT 3.51 installer driver floppies for virtio-scsi)

screenshot_winnt3-1_2016-10-29_191707Lesson 2: OMG I’m so glad I don’t have to wait for things to be read off floppy disks anymore:

screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_193833Lesson 3: I’d forgotten that the Windows directory on NT 3.51 was different to every other Windows NT version, being \WINNT35

screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_194040screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_194139Lesson 3: Yeah, sometimes there’s just fail.

screenshot_winnt3-51_2016-10-29_194147

Windows NT 4.0

This brought the UI of Windows 95 to Windows NT. It was a thing. It required a fairly beefy PC for the day, but it could use two CPUs if you were that amazingly rich (dual Pentium Pro was a thing)

Lesson 1: Windows NT 4 does not like 8GB disks. My idea of “creating a small disk for a VM for an old OS as it probably won’t work well with a 20GB disk” needs to be adjusted. I’m writing this on a system with 8 times more RAM than what I ended up using for a disk for Windows NT 4.

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192840But hey, back to \WINNT rather than \WINNT35 or \WINDOWS

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192937

Lesson 2: Sometimes, full system emulation turns out to be a better idea:

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192418screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_192304Lesson 3: Remember when Windows couldn’t actually format NTFS in the installer and it installed to FAT and then converted to NTFS? No? Well, aren’t you lucky.

screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_193102screenshot_winnt4-0_2016-10-29_193235Apple Rhapsody DR2

Before there was MacOS X, there was a project called Rhapsody. This was to take NeXTStep (from NeXT, which Apple bought to get both NeXTStep and Steve Jobs as every internal “let’s replace the aging MacOS” project had utterly failed for the past ten years). Rhapsody was not going to be backwards compatible until everybody said that was a terrible idea and the Blue Box was added (known as Classic) – basically, a para-virtualized VM running the old MacOS 9.

Anyway, for the first two developer releases, it was also available on x86 (not just PowerPC). This was probably because a PowerPC port to Macs was a lot newer than the x86 port.

So, I dusted off the (virtual) Boot and Driver floppies and fired up qemu…..

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_172732Yeah, MacOS X got a better installer…

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_173227Hopeful!

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_182218This was after I decided that using KVM was a bad Idea:

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_172143

screenshot_rhapsodydr2_2016-10-29_173333Nope… and this is where we stop. There seems to be some issue with ATA drivers? I honestly can’t be bothered to debug it (although… for the PowerPC version… maybe).

MacOS 9.2

Well.. this goes a lot better now thanks to a whole bunch of patches hitting upstream Qemu recently (thanks Ben!)

screenshot-from-2016-10-29-20-37-24screenshot-from-2016-10-29-20-42-10Yeah, I was kind of tempted to set up Outlook Express to read my email…. But running MacOS 9 was way too successful, so I had to stop there :)

Microsoft Chicago – retro in qemu!

So, way back when (sometime in the early 1990s) there was Windows 3.11 and times were… for Workgroups. There was this Windows NT thing, this OS/2 thing and something brewing at Microsoft to attempt to make the PC less… well, bloody awful for a user.

Again, thanks to abandonware sites, it’s possible now to try out very early builds of Microsoft Chicago – what would become Windows 95. With the earliest build I could find (build 56), I set to work. The installer worked from an existing Windows 3.11 install.

I ended up using full system emulation rather than normal qemu later on, as things, well, booted in full emulation and didn’t otherwise (I was building from qemu master… so it could have actually been a bug fix).

chicago-launch-setupMmmm… Windows 3.11 File Manager, the fact that I can still use this is a testament to something, possibly too much time with Windows 3.11.

chicago-welcome-setupchicago-setupUnfortunately, I didn’t have the Plus Pack components (remember Microsoft Plus! ?- yes, the exclamation mark was part of the product, it was the 1990s.) and I’m not sure if they even would have existed back then (but the installer did ask).

chicago-install-dirObviously if you were testing Chicago, you probably did not want to upgrade your working Windows install if this was a computer you at all cared about. I installed into C:\CHICAGO because, well – how could I not!

chicago-installingThe installation went fairly quickly – after all, this isn’t a real 386 PC and it doesn’t have of-the-era disks – everything was likely just in the linux page cache.

chicago-install-networkI didn’t really try to get network going, it may not have been fully baked in this build, or maybe just not really baked in this copy of it, but the installer there looks a bit familiar, but not like the Windows 95 one – maybe more like NT 3.1/3.51 ?

But at the end… it installed and it was time to reboot into Chicago:
chicago-bootSo… this is what Windows 95 looked like during development back in July 1993 – nearly exactly two years before release. There’s some Windows logos that appear/disappear around the place, which are arguably much cooler than the eventual Windows 95 boot screen animation. The first boot experience was kind of interesting too:
Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-57-00Luckily, there was nothing restricting the beta site ID or anything. I just entered the number 1, and was then told it needed to be 6 digits – so beta site ID 123456 it is! The desktop is obviously different both from Windows 3.x and what ended up in Windows 95.

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-57-48Those who remember Windows 3.1 may remember Dr Watson as an actual thing you could run, but it was part of the whole diagnostics infrastructure in Windows, and here (as you can see), it runs by default. More odd is the “Switch To Chicago” task (which does nothing if opened) and “Tracker”. My guess is that the “Switch to Chicago” is the product of some internal thing for launching the new UI. I have no ideawhat the “Tracker” is, but I think I found a clue in the “Find File” app:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 14-10-10Not only can you search with regular expressions, but there’s “Containing text”, could it be indexing? No, it totally isn’t. It’s all about tracking/reporting problems:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 14-15-19Well, that wasn’t as exciting as I was hoping for (after all, weren’t there interesting database like file systems being researched at Microsoft in the early 1990s?). It’s about here I should show the obligatory About box:
Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-58-10It’s… not polished, and there’s certainly that feel throughout the OS, it’s not yet polished – and two years from release: that’s likely fair enough. Speaking of not perfect:

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 20-59-03When something does crash, it asks you to describe what went wrong, i.e. provide a Clue for Dr. Watson:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-09-22

But, most importantly, Solitaire is present! You can browse the Programs folder and head into Games and play it! One odd tihng is that applications have two >> at the end, and there’s a “Parent Folder” entry too.

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-01-24Solitair itself? Just as I remember.

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 21-21-27Notably, what is missing is anything like the Start menu, which is probably the key UI element introduced in Windows 95 that’s still with us today. Instead, you have this:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 11-55-15That’s about the least exciting Windows menu possible. There’s the eye menu too, which is this:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 11-56-12More unfinished things are found in the “File cabinet”, such as properties for anything:
Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-02-00But let’s jump into Control Panels, which I managed to get to by heading to C:\CHICAGO\Control.sys – which isn’t exactly obvious, but I think you can find it through Programs as well.Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-02-41Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-05-40The “Window Metrics” application is really interesting! It’s obvious that the UI was not solidified yet, that there was a lot of experimenting to do. This application lets you change all sorts of things about the UI:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-05-57My guess is that this was used a lot internally to twiddle things to see what worked well.

Another unfinished thing? That familiar Properties for My Computer, which is actually “Advanced System Features” in the control panel, and from the [Sample Information] at the bottom left, it looks like we may not be getting information about the machine it’s running on.

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-06-39

You do get some information in the System control panel, but a lot of it is unfinished. It seems as if Microsoft was experimenting with a few ways to express information and modify settings.

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-07-13But check out this awesome picture of a hard disk for Virtual Memory:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-07-47The presence of the 386 Enhanced control panel shows how close this build still was to Windows 3.1:

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-08-08At the same time, we see hints of things going 32 bit – check out the fact that we have both Clock and Clock32! Notepad, in its transition to 32bit, even dropped the pad and is just Note32!

Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-11-10Well, that’s enough for today, time to shut down the machine:
Screenshot from 2016-08-13 12-15-45

Windows 3.11 nostalgia

Because OS/2 didn’t go so well… let’s try something I’m a lot more familiar with. To be honest, the last time I in earnest used Windows on the desktop was around 3.11, so I kind of know it back to front (fun fact: I’ve read the entire Windows 3.0 manual).

It turns out that once you have MS-DOS installed in qemu, installing Windows 3.11 is trivial. I didn’t even change any settings for Qemu, I just basically specced everything up to be very minimal (50MB RAM, 512mb disk).

win31-setupwin31-disk4win31-installedWindows 3.11 was not a fun time as soon as you had to do anything… nightmares of drivers, CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT plague my mind. But hey, it’s damn fast on a modern processor.

OS/2 Warp Nostalgia

Thanks to the joys of abandonware websites, you can play with some interesting things from the 1990s and before. One of those things is OS/2 Warp. Now, I had a go at OS/2 sometime in the 1990s after being warned by a friend that it was “pretty much impossible” to get networking going. My experience of OS/2 then was not revolutionary… It was, well, something else on a PC that wasn’t that exciting and didn’t really add a huge amount over Windows.

Now, I’m nowhere near insane enough to try this on my actual computer, and I’ve managed to not accumulate any ancient PCs….

Luckily, qemu helps with an emulator! If you don’t set your CPU to Pentium (or possibly something one or two generations newer) then things don’t go well. Neither does a disk that by today’s standards would be considered beyond tiny. Also, if you dare to try to use an unpartitioned hard disk – OH MY are you in trouble.

Also, try to boot off “Disk 1” and you get this:
os2-wrong-floppyPossibly the most friendly error message ever! But, once you get going (by booting the Installation floppy)… you get to see this:

Screenshot from 2016-08-07 19-12-19and indeed, you are doing the time warp of Operating Systems right here. After a bit of fun, you end up in FDISK:

os2-installos2-1gb-too-muchWhy I can’t create a partition… WHO KNOWS. But, I tried again with a 750MB disk that already had a partition on it and…. FAIL. I think this one was due to partition type, so I tried again with partition type of 6 – plain FAT16, and not W95 FAT16 (LBA). Some memory is coming back to me of larger drives and LBA and nightmares…

But that worked!

warp4-installingos2-checkingThen, the OS/2 WARP boot screen… which seems to stick around for a long time…..

os2-install-2and maybe I could get networking….

os2-networkLadies and Gentlemen, the wonders of having to select DHCP:

os2-dhcpIt still asked me for some config, but I gleefully ignored it (because that must be safe, right!?) and then I needed to select a network adapter! Due to a poor choice on my part, I started with a rtl8139, which is conspicuously absent from this fine list of Token Ring adapters:

os2-tokenringand then, more installing……

os2-more-installingbefore finally rebooting into….

os2-failand that, is where I realized there was beer in the fridge and that was going to be a lot more fun.

Fuzzing Firmware – afl-fuzz + skiboot

In what is likely to be a series on how firmware makes some normal tools harder to use, first I’m going to look at american fuzzy lop – a tool for fuzz testing that if you’re not using then you most certainly have bugs it’ll find for you.

I first got interested in afl-fuzz during Erik de Castro Lopo’s excellent linux.conf.au 2016 in Geelong earlier this year: “Fuzz all the things!“. In a previous life, the Random Query Generator managed to find a heck of a lot of bugs in MySQL (and Drizzle). For randgen info, see Philip Stoev’s talk on it from way back in 2009, a recent (2014) blog post on how Tokutek uses it and some notes on how it was being used at Oracle from 2013. Basically, the randgen was a specialized fuzzer that (given a grammar) would randomly generate SQL queries, and then (if the server didn’t crash), compare the result to some other database server (e.g. your previous version).

The afl-fuzz fuzzer takes a different approach – it’s a much more generic fuzzer rather than a targeted tool. Also, while tools such as the random query generator are extremely powerful and find specialized bugs, they’re hard to get started with. A huge benefit of afl-fuzz is that it’s really, really simple to get started with.

Basically, if you have a binary that takes input on stdin or as a (relatively small) file, afl-fuzz will just work and find bugs for you – read the Quick Start Guide and you’ll be finding bugs in no time!

For firmware of course, we’re a little different than a simple command line program as, well, we aren’t one! Luckily though, we have unit tests. These are just standard binaries that include a bunch of firmware code and get run in user space as part of “make check”. Also, just like unit tests for any project, people do send me patches that break tests (which I reject).

Some of these tests act on data we get from a place – maybe reading other parts of firmware off PNOR or interacting with data structures we get from other bits of firmware. For testing this code, it can be relatively easy to (for the test), read these off disk.

For skiboot, there’s a data structure we get from the service processor on FSP machines called HDAT. Basically, it’s just like the device tree, but different. Because yet another binary format is always a good idea (yes, that is laced with a heavy dose of sarcasm). One of the steps in early boot is to parse the HDAT data structure and convert it to a device tree. Luckily, we structured our code so that creating a unit test that can run in userspace was relatively easy, we just needed to dump this data structure out from a running machine. You can see the test case here. Basically, hdat_to_dt is a binary that reads the HDAT structure out of a pair of files and prints out a device tree. One of the regression tests we have is that we always produce the same output from the same input.

So… throwing that into AFL yielded a couple of pretty simple bugs, especially around aborting out on invalid data (it’s better to exit the process with failure rather than hit an assert). Nothing too interesting here on my simple input file, but it does mean that our parsing code exits “gracefully” on invalid data.

Another utility we have is actually a userspace utility for accessing the gard records in the flash. A GARD record is a record of a piece of hardware that has been deconfigured due to a fault (or a suspected fault). Usually this utility operates on PNOR flash through /dev/mtd – but really what it’s doing is talking to the libflash library, that we also use inside skiboot (and on OpenBMC) to read/write from flash directly, via /dev/mtd or just from a file. The good news? I haven’t been able to crash this utility yet!

So I modified the pflash utility to read from a file to attempt to fuzz the partition reading code we have for the partitioning format that’s on PNOR. So far, no crashes – although to even get it going I did have to fix a bug in the file handling code in pflash, so that’s already a win!

But crashing bugs aren’t the only type of bugs – afl-fuzz has exposed several cases where we act on uninitialized data. How? Well, we run some test cases under valgrind! This is the joy of user space unit tests for firmware – valgrind becomes a tool that you can run! Unfortunately, these bugs have been sitting in my “todo” pile (which is, of course, incredibly long).

Where to next? Fuzzing the firmware calls themselves would be nice – although that’s going to require a targeted tool that knows about what to pass each of the calls. Another round of afl-fuzz running would also be good, I’ve fixed a bunch of the simple things and having a better set of starting input files would be great (and likely expose more bugs).

My linux.conf.au 2016 talk “Adventures in OpenPower Firmware” is up!

Thanks to the absolutely amazing efforts of the LCA video team, they’ve already (only a few days after I gave it) got the video from my linux.conf.au 2016 talk up!

Abstract

In mid 2014, IBM released the first POWER8 based systems with the new Free and Open Source OPAL firmware. Since then, several members of the OpenPower foundation have produced (or are currently producing) machines based on the POWER8 processor with the OPAL firmware.

This talk will cover the POWER8 chip with an open source firmware stack and how it all fits together.

We will walk through all of the firmware components and what they do, including the boot sequence from power being applied up to booting an operating system.

We’ll delve into:
– the time before you have RAM
– the time before you have thermal management
– the time before you have PCI
– runtime processor diagnostics and repair
– the bootloader (and extending it)
– building and flashing your own firmware
– using a simulator instead
– the firmware interface that Linux talks to
– device tree and OPAL calls
– fun in firmware QA and testing

View

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4XGvssR-ag

Download (webm): http://mirror.linux.org.au/linux.conf.au/2016/03_Wednesday/Costa_Hall/Adventures_in_OpenPower_Firmware.webm

An update on using Tor on Android

Back in 2012 I wrote a blog post on using Tor on Android which has proved quite popular over the years.

These days, there is the OrFox browser, which is from The Tor Project and is likely the current best way to browse the web through Tor on your Android device.

If you’re still using the custom setup Firefox, I’d recommend giving OrFox a try – it’s been working quite well for me.

FreeBSD on OpenPower

There’s been some work on porting FreeBSD over to run natively on top of OPAL, that is, on bare metal OpenPower machines (not just under KVM).

This is one of four possible things to run natively on an OPAL system:

  1. Linux
  2. hello_world (in skiboot tree)
  3. ppc64le_hello (as I wrote about yesterday)
  4. FreeBSD

It’s great to see that another fully featured OS is getting ported to POWER8 and OPAL. It’s not yet at a stage where you could say it was finished or anything (PCI support is pretty preliminary for example, and fancy things like disks and networking live on PCI).

Amounts of RAM for devices so that I no longer have to worry about it.

I think this is my current “okay, I don’t have to worry about RAM” list currently:

  • Phone/Tablet: 2GB
  • Laptop: 8GB (although 8GB is better… 4GB is tolerable IFF SSD)
  • Development server: 16GB (32GB if shared) (emacs+gcc)
  • Box for testing things: 128GB (virtualization, databases)

This is… kind of mind bending.

Cyanogenmod with encryption on a Sony Z1 Compact

So, new personal surveillance device (it’s pink! No more BORING black phone!).

Needed to be able to load my own firmware on it and have encryption. It turns out I had to go and do things like this: http://forum.cyanogenmod.org/topic/82292-cm102-encryption-does-not-start-stuck-at-splash-screen/page__hl__+encryption#entry460839 which is, in fact, repartitioning my phone.

It’s been a while since I’ve had to do math on partitions to get a Linux installed somewhere… but if you don’t change where the filesystem is, you can’t run with encryption.

Basically, if enabling encryption isn’t working, run “adb logcat” on your computer and look for ” E/Cryptfs ( 1890): Orig filesystem overlaps crypto footer region.  Cannot encrypt in place.” if you see that, you’re going to need to boot into recovery and ” adb shell” before finding what block device /data is (check the output of “mount”) and then check the number of blocks it is in /proc/partitions before running mkfs.ext4 on it but with a device size of a few kb less than the device (I think I picked 16kb less. After doing that, everything “just worked”.

how do I deal with OTA updates? Quite easily – copy the zip to the SD card and install from there.

Tyan OpenPower

Good news everyone! Tyan has announced the availability of their first OpenPOWER system! They call this a Customer Reference System, which means it’s an excellent machine to start poking at OpenPower and POWER8 (or deploying applications on).

Because it’s an OpenPower machine, it runs the open source Open Power firmware (all up on github) and will happily run Linux (feel free to port your other operating system kernels). I’ll be writing more on the OpenPower firmware soon as, well, technical details are fun!

Ubuntu 14.10 is listed as recommended as not only have they been building for POWER8 but have spent some time ensuring things work fairly well out-of-the-box (both as a KVM guest and running native on the bare metal). Or, you can always just boot whatever the mainline kernel is at – build for the POWERNV (POWER non-virtualized) platform (be sure to include all the required drivers) and have fun!

Things that are not news

The following are not news:

  • Human has genitals (which may/may not have been exposed)
  • Absolutely anything about The Bachelor
  • Anything any celebrity is wearing, anyone they’re dating or if they are currently wearing underwear.
  • any list of “top 10” things.
  • TEENAGERS DO THINGS THAT TEENAGERS DO!

(feel free to extend the list)

MySQL 5.6 on POWER (patch available)

The following sentence is brought to you by IBM Legal. The postings on this site are my own and don’t necessarily represent IBM’s positions, strategies or opinions.

Okay, now that is out of the way….

If you’re the kind of person who follows the MySQL bugs database closely or subscribes to the MySQL Internals mailing list, you may have worked out that I’ve spent a small amount of time poking at MySQL on modern POWER systems.

Unlike Intel CPUs, POWER CPUs require explicit memory barriers to synchronize memory state between different CPUs. This means that when you’re implementing synchronization primitives, you have one extra thing to get right.

Luckily, if you use straight pthread mutexes, this is already taken care of. Unluckily, there are some optimizations in MySQL that don’t use straight pthread mutexes and so may be problematic on non-Intel CPUs. A few of these issues have sneaked into MySQL over the past few years. The most problematic area was around the optimized mutexes in InnoDB (you can use the pthread_mutex fallback code, but it’s less performant).

Luckily, I both knew where to look and there are good asserts throughout InnoDB code to help spot any other areas that I may not have initially thought of to look at. Coding defensively with a good amount of asserts is a good thing.

After not too much work, I have a set of patches that I’m fairly confident is correct and performs near as well as possible. Initially, I had a different patch that used heavyweight memory barriers in a lot of places, but big kudos to Yasufumi for posting a better patch than mine to bug 47213 – using the lighter weight barriers gives a decent performance boost.

One of the key patches is in the InnoDB mutex code to change the thread priority – i.e. a POWER equivalent to the x86 pause instruction. These are hints to the CPU that the thread being executed is in a spinloop and CPU resources should be allocated to other threads to make betterr forward progress.

After dragging Anton in to have a look and a think, this code may have motivated him to have a go at getting kernel support for adaptive mutexes, thus removing the need for this spin/sleep/yield/eep loop in InnoDB (at least on Linux).

So… I’ve spent the appropriate time filing bugs in the MySQL bug tracker for the things I’ve found. Feel free to track them yourself, they are:

  • Bug 72715: character set code endianness dependent on CPU type rather than endianness of CP
    • I don’t think this is an issue for us… or it could be that this is actually just incredibly untested code in the MySQL Server. It’s also not POWER specific, although was caught by the Migration Assistant which is part of the Advanced Toolchain from IBM.
  • Bug 72718: CACHE_LINE_SIZE in innodb should be 128 on POWER
    • I contributed a patch that’s a simple #ifdef for CPU type. Those who care about other CPU architectures should chime in with the correct value for them.
    • There’s other places in InnoDB where there’s some padding that don’t use this define, I need to file a bug for that.
  • Bug 72754: Set thread priority in InnoDB mutex spinloop
    • This makes a big difference when you have mutex contention and SMT (Symmetric Multi-Threading) enabled (on POWER, you can dynamically change SMT levels at runtime).
    • I’ve contributed a preliminary patch that isn’t generic. I should go and fix that.
  • Bug 72755: InnoDB mutex spin loop is missing GCC barrier
    • This also applies to x86 (and indeed all platforms). If GCC gets a bit smarter, the current code could compile down to nothing, which is exactly what you don’t want from a spinloop. The correct thing to do is to have a GCC memory barrier (not CPU one) to ensure that the compiler doesn’t optimize away the spinning.
    • I’ve contributed a patch, may need #ifdef GCC added.
  • Bug 72809: InnoDB Linux native aio setup missing barrier after setup
    • This appears to be a “POWER8 is fast” related bug :)
    • Patch contributed.
  • Bug 72811: Set NUMA mempolicy for optimum mysqld performance
    • Not POWER specific.
    • I’ve contributed a patch that sets NUMA memory allocation policy inside mysqld rather than having to run “numactl” manually
  • Bug 47213: InnoDB mutex/rw_lock should be conscious about memory ordering other than Intel
    • Originally filed by Yasufumi back in 2009.
    • Some good discussion going on here to ensure the patch is correct. This is the kind of patch that requires more review  than it takes to write it.
    • This patch would fix the majority of problems for non-Intel CPU architectures.
    • Thanks to Yasufumi for providing an updated patch, it helped a lot!
  • Bug 72544: Incorrect locking for global_query_id
    • I found a bug. Rather benign and not POWER specific.

Want to run MySQL 5.6.17 on POWER? Get my MySQL 5.6.17 patch here: https://flamingspork.com/mysql/mysql-5.6.17-POWER.patch

My accumulation of 5.6 patches seems fairly reliable. I’d test before putting into production, and I’d certainly love to know any problems you hit.

Get the quilt series of patches here: https://flamingspork.com/mysql/mysql-5.6.17-POWER-patches.tar.gz

I have, of course, done the legal wrangling for the Oracle Contributor Agreement (remarkably painless) and am working on making the patches completely acceptable to be merged into MySQL.

Ghosts of MySQL Past, Part 7: PBXT

Recently, I’ve been writing based on my linux.conf.au 2014 talk, which you can watch the recording of. Also see Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5 and Part 6. My feed feel off Planet MySQL for a bit so you may have missed those posts – so feel free to go on a trip down memory lane before returning here for, well, more of a trip down memory lane.

At the start of 2005, Paul McCullagh started working on a new transactional storage engine for MySQL. He announced it in early 2006, so the majority of initial development was done before Oracle bought InnoBase Oy.

It’s at this point I should correct myself from my Part 5 where I was talking about when Maria started – it was actually at the start of 2005 when the project started, about 10 months before InnoDB Friday. I think this was mostly small scale work at first, before months later having a larger focus on it.

But anyway, let’s talk about PBXT! It had a different architecture than InnoDB and thus could have an interesting set of performance characteristics. The shortest way to describe the original architecture is “kind of log based”. Rows are written to a log file and there’s a handle file that points to where the rows are in the log.

Also, the design had both a fixed size and a variable sized part of the row. The fixed size part was stored alongside the handle in the record data file, so it was incredibly quick at getting the fixed size part of the row.

Not having to write data twice and having really quick access to some columns gave PBXT a quite decent performance advantage for many work loads.

The BLOB Streaming feature that was also worked on (originally just for PBXT and then for any engine) was quite ahead of its time. Think HandlerSocket but think of it done more correctly. HandlerSocket is an awful binary protocol that supports very limited operations and uses two TCP ports (one for reads, one for writes). The blob streaming used HTTP, something that anyone could use and manipulate and proxy and whatever you’d want.

If we look at Paul’s Top 5 Wishes for storage engines, an engine test suite and sane APIs (or at least documented) would clearly have helped. Having to do API tracing to discover when you should start a transaction is probably not the best way to attract developers – the amount of time that could have been saved given better interfaces in the server was immense (and not just for PBXT developers).

So, why aren’t we all using PBXT now? Well… if MySQL had shipped with PBXT, it would possibly have been a different story. There was (and indeed is) a very uneven playing field for MySQL storage engines. If you’re in the main MySQL tree then you’re everywhere. If not, then you’ve got a heck of a lot of work on packaging and keeping up to date with various API changes (not to mention ABI, which since we’re talking C++ and since we’re talking MySQL, changed a lot). With InnoDB being “good enough” for many and actually being forced to improve due to challengers such as PBXT (as well as being in the tree) it just continued to have the majority of the users… and it’s not easy making money as a storage engine vendor – and developing a storage engine does cost money.

With no more than a couple of people working on it at any one time, it’s amazing that PBXT had such a big influence – and we can likely credit many InnoDB performance improvement to PBXT being so much better in some areas.

An interesting side story: I was sending some build fixes/complier warning fixes and other minimal patches to Paul when MySQL belonged to Sun and he mentioned that perhaps it was time he had a contributor agreement. I pointed out the Sun contributor agreement as an example of one that could be used, and maybe he could just replace “Sun Microsystems” with “PrimeBase” and I could submit that to the Sun system – at the very least, it would be amusing. Paul said that sounded like a great idea and I submitted Sun’s contributor agreement (which it expected outside contributors to agree to) to Sun for them to agree to.

Well… a few weeks later I got a response, and Sun wasn’t exactly keen on it – until I pointed out a few times that it was in fact their agreement and then finally it was all okay.

If your company wants people to agree to a contributor agreement: see if they’d agree to it if it was for someone else. It was an interesting exercise.

Further reading: